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TRACK LIST:
1. Daydream
2. There She Is
3. It's Not Time Now
4. Warm Baby
5. Day Blues
6. Let The Boy Rock N Roll
7. Jug Band Music
8. Didn't Want To Have To Do It
9. You Didn't Have To Be So Nice
10. Bald Headed Lena
11. Butchie's Tune
12. Big Noise From Speonk

The Lovin' Spoonful

LP | $21.98  $19.78

LP 5508

Add to Cart

Preorder now and save 10%!
This title is available for preorder and will ship on or before the street date of June 30th.

Mono Editions on 180 gram vinyl and compact disc.

Greenwich Village, 1964: While the folk boom is still in progress, other musics began seeping into the corners and clubs of lower Manhattan. Rock, once down for the count, came back with a vengeance, largely thanks to a klatch of young British bands. Roots music, especially blues, grew rapidly in popularity as folk enthusiasts expanded their horizons. In this intoxicating milieu, John Sebastian, Zal Yanovsky, Joe Butler and Steve Boone united to form the Lovin’ Spoonful. Originally a jug band with folk roots, they readily incorporated the sounds they heard all around them. Combining British Invasion jangle with the blues’ growl and folk’s attention to lyrical detail, they forged a sound completely their own. Accomplished musicians all, they had two secret weapons: the guitar virtuosity of Zal Yanovsky and the rising songwriting talent of John Sebastian.

The first Spoonful single, “Do You Believe in Magic,” took AM radio by storm in June of that year, reaching #9 on the Billboard Hot 100. Featuring an irrepressible melody, a chiming autoharp and Yanovsky’s tasteful fills, it was an audacious debut. Their inaugural Kama Sutra LP, also titled Do You Believe in Magic, followed in November 1965. Containing three other Sebastian originals and one song credited to the band, the balance of the LP contained traditional blues covers and songs by contemporary writers. Reaching #32 on the Billboard Top 200, it established the band as one of country’s brightest new talents.

By the release of their second album, Daydream, in March 1966, the band’s songwriting chops had fully blossomed, particularly Sebastian’s, who wrote or co-wrote all but one of the songs. The album’s first single, “You Didn’t Have to Be So Nice” reached #10 on the Hot 100 and married a signature Yanovsky riff with a galloping piano part to form an indelible hook. The title track, a mid-tempo reverie with an ace whistling solo, did even better, soaring to #2. Skipping ahead a few decades, the album cut “Butchie’s Tune” was used to great effect in season five of Mad Men.

The band soon returned with Hums of the Lovin’ Spoonful. Consciously working in different styles, the band essayed country (“Nashville Cats”), folk balladry (“Rain on the Roof”) and psych- tinged rock (“Summer in the City”), among other sounds. This time, all the songs were originals and it was the last full album recorded by the original quartet. It stands as a triumphant ending to one of the most exciting chapters in the American rock story of the 1960s, a perfect encapsulation of a time when it seemed anything was possible in music.

Sourced from the original Kama Sutra mono masters, these masterpieces are pressed at RTI on 180gm vinyl, and are also available as limited edition compact discs!

• 180 Gram R.T.I. Vinyl Pressing
• Limited Compact Disc Edition
• From the Original Kama Sutra Mono Masters




Click HERE for more info on Daydream - 180 Gram Mono Edition LP




SIDE A
1. Groovy Grubworm

SIDE B
2. Scratchy

The Greg Martin Group

7" single | $8.98  $8.08

RFD 2014

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Order now and save 10%!

The new, down-home, from-the-heart imprint: SUNDAZED RFD!

• GIGANTIC GUITARS!
• 7" VINYL!
• GOLD WAX!
• GORGEOUS PICTURE SLEEVES!

Two Storming Instrumental Cuts from the Kentucky Headhunters Guitar Slinger!

The Kentucky Headhunters’ legendary guitar guru Greg Martin’s debut solo single! Joined by Dean Smith and Steve Holmes, Martin and associates lay down storming, stomping renditions of two favorite ‘60s numbers, “Groovy Grubworm” and “Scratchy”—the former a brilliant marriage of a modified Bo Diddley beat and country and western boogie, and the latter a sleek, shining reading of Travis Wammack’s 1964 original! Both feature Martin’s 1958 Les Paul Standard, 1968 Marshall 50-watt Plexi head, and ‘60s Marshall 4x12 cabinet coupled with his untouchable tone and technique, cut to mono and recorded live and as-it-happened just as if the sessions had taken place 50 years ago. A turbo takeoff for both the Greg Martin Group and Sundazed RFD!

“Growing up in Louisville, KY, I was hearing a healthy diet of instrumental artists on local radio stations. ’Groovy Grubworm’ and ‘Scratchy’ are two of the songs I grew up hearing as I was learning to play. This project is a culmination of everything I’ve learned over the years. Getting to do an instrumental project on a vinyl 45 was a childhood dream!” - Greg Martin (Greg Martin Group / Kentucky Headhunters)



Click HERE for more info on GROOVY GRUBWORM / SCRATCHY




TRACK LISTING:
1. The Lonely Bull
2. Bullseye!

The East Nashville Teens

7" (vinyl) | $8.98  $8.08

RFD 2015

Add to Cart

Order now and save 10%!

The new, down-home, from-the-heart imprint: SUNDAZED RFD!

• GIGANTIC GUITARS!
• 7" VINYL!
• GOLD WAX!
• GORGEOUS PICTURE SLEEVES!

Featuring Bob Irwin and Eddie Angel!

Astounding, you-are-there recreations of the shimmering, sparkling sounds of the Shadows, Ventures, and other early string sensations! The first single by the East Nashville Teens—a collaboration of Bob Irwin and the Pluto Walkers with founding Los Straitjackets members Eddie Angel and Jimmy Lester—“The Lonely Bull/Bullseye!” is the explosion of creativity as generated by five 45 rpm-obsessed musicians! Featuring Irwin and Angel on lead guitars and supported by Lester, Ed Wasilewski and Chris Fisher, an all-star rhythm section suited to bring the true sound of a golden era of recording and performing back to life, both sides are charging trips into a world where stinging melody is the thing, and tube tone is the king!

If you’ve ever been playing your vintage favorites and asked yourself, “Why can’t people make records like this anymore?”—here's the answer, they can, and do! Recorded with vintage equipment and mixing techniques (and mixed to mono!) “The Lonely Bull” and “Bullseye” comes in a gorgeous, mid ’60s-looking sleeve that'll be right at home with your Exotic Guitars records. Join the East Nashville Teens on their reverb-fueled journey today!



Click HERE for more info on The Lonely Bull / Bullseye! - 7" Single




TRACK LISTING:
1. Shark Country
2. Burton's Move

SloBeats - featuring Kenny Vaughan

7" (vinyl) | $8.98  $8.08

RFD 2016

Add to Cart

Order now and save 10%!

The new, down-home, from-the-heart imprint: SUNDAZED RFD!

• GIGANTIC GUITARS!
• 7" VINYL!
• GOLD WAX!
• GORGEOUS PICTURE SLEEVES!


Featuring Kenny Vaughan!

Kenny Vaughan is the guitarists’ guitarist in a city filled with six-stringers. Dave Roe has played bass for nearly EVERYBODY worth hearing. Max Schauf can nail down a rhythm tighter than your favorite jeans. Together, they are SloBeats, a trio bent on bringing instrumental sophistication to musical connoisseurs everywhere. In their experienced hands, songs become aural travelogues, taking you on a journey through genres and styles. It’s a trip you’ll want to take again and again.
The single’s A-side, “Shark Country,” is a surf instrumental, marinated in reverb and sautéed in saltwater. Listen closely as Vaughan adds some Les Paul-esque touches in the background, creating a multilayered atmosphere full of anticipation with a hint of menace. Cowabunga! The B-side, “Burton’s Move,” tips its titular hat to Telecaster pioneer James Burton with a decidedly danceable rhythm. You couldn’t ask for a more fitting tribute to one of the most tasteful guitarists in history!

As part of the Sundazed RFD series, this single showcases some of Nashville’s finest musicians. It is a direct reflection of the depth of talent and sheer joy of playing inherent in the Music City scene!



Click HERE for more info on Shark Country / Burton's Move - 7" Single




TRACK LISTING:
1. Do You Believe In Magic
2. Blues In The Bottle
3. Sportin Life
4. My Gal
5. You Baby
6. Fishin Blues
7. Did You Ever Have To Make Up Your Mind
8. Wild About My Lovin
9. Other Side Of This Life
10. Younger Girl
11. On The Road Again
12. Night Owl Blues

The Lovin' Spoonful

compact disc | $12.98  $11.68

SC 6334

Add to Cart

Preorder now and save 10%!
This title is available for preorder and will ship on or before the street date of June 30th.

Mono Editions on 180 gram vinyl and compact disc.

Greenwich Village, 1964: While the folk boom is still in progress, other musics began seeping into the corners and clubs of lower Manhattan. Rock, once down for the count, came back with a vengeance, largely thanks to a klatch of young British bands. Roots music, especially blues, grew rapidly in popularity as folk enthusiasts expanded their horizons. In this intoxicating milieu, John Sebastian, Zal Yanovsky, Joe Butler and Steve Boone united to form the Lovin’ Spoonful. Originally a jug band with folk roots, they readily incorporated the sounds they heard all around them. Combining British Invasion jangle with the blues’ growl and folk’s attention to lyrical detail, they forged a sound completely their own. Accomplished musicians all, they had two secret weapons: the guitar virtuosity of Zal Yanovsky and the rising songwriting talent of John Sebastian.

The first Spoonful single, “Do You Believe in Magic,” took AM radio by storm in June of that year, reaching #9 on the Billboard Hot 100. Featuring an irrepressible melody, a chiming autoharp and Yanovsky’s tasteful fills, it was an audacious debut. Their inaugural Kama Sutra LP, also titled Do You Believe in Magic, followed in November 1965. Containing three other Sebastian originals and one song credited to the band, the balance of the LP contained traditional blues covers and songs by contemporary writers. Reaching #32 on the Billboard Top 200, it established the band as one of country’s brightest new talents.

By the release of their second album, Daydream, in March 1966, the band’s songwriting chops had fully blossomed, particularly Sebastian’s, who wrote or co-wrote all but one of the songs. The album’s first single, “You Didn’t Have to Be So Nice” reached #10 on the Hot 100 and married a signature Yanovsky riff with a galloping piano part to form an indelible hook. The title track, a mid-tempo reverie with an ace whistling solo, did even better, soaring to #2. Skipping ahead a few decades, the album cut “Butchie’s Tune” was used to great effect in season five of Mad Men.

The band soon returned with Hums of the Lovin’ Spoonful. Consciously working in different styles, the band essayed country (“Nashville Cats”), folk balladry (“Rain on the Roof”) and psych- tinged rock (“Summer in the City”), among other sounds. This time, all the songs were originals and it was the last full album recorded by the original quartet. It stands as a triumphant ending to one of the most exciting chapters in the American rock story of the 1960s, a perfect encapsulation of a time when it seemed anything was possible in music.

Sourced from the original Kama Sutra mono masters, these masterpieces are pressed at RTI on 180gm vinyl, and are also available as limited edition compact discs!

• 180 Gram R.T.I. Vinyl Pressing
• Limited Compact Disc Edition
• From the Original Kama Sutra Mono Masters




Click HERE for more info on Do You Believe In Magic - Mono Edition CD




TRACK LIST:
1. Daydream
2. There She Is
3. It's Not Time Now
4. Warm Baby
5. Day Blues
6. Let The Boy Rock N Roll
7. Jug Band Music
8. Didn't Want To Have To Do It
9. You Didn't Have To Be So Nice
10. Bald Headed Lena
11. Butchie's Tune
12. Big Noise From Speonk

The Lovin' Spoonful

compact disc | $12.98  $11.68

SC 6335

Add to Cart

Preorder now and save 10%!
This title is available for preorder and will ship on or before the street date of June 30th.

Mono Editions on 180 gram vinyl and compact disc.

Greenwich Village, 1964: While the folk boom is still in progress, other musics began seeping into the corners and clubs of lower Manhattan. Rock, once down for the count, came back with a vengeance, largely thanks to a klatch of young British bands. Roots music, especially blues, grew rapidly in popularity as folk enthusiasts expanded their horizons. In this intoxicating milieu, John Sebastian, Zal Yanovsky, Joe Butler and Steve Boone united to form the Lovin’ Spoonful. Originally a jug band with folk roots, they readily incorporated the sounds they heard all around them. Combining British Invasion jangle with the blues’ growl and folk’s attention to lyrical detail, they forged a sound completely their own. Accomplished musicians all, they had two secret weapons: the guitar virtuosity of Zal Yanovsky and the rising songwriting talent of John Sebastian.

The first Spoonful single, “Do You Believe in Magic,” took AM radio by storm in June of that year, reaching #9 on the Billboard Hot 100. Featuring an irrepressible melody, a chiming autoharp and Yanovsky’s tasteful fills, it was an audacious debut. Their inaugural Kama Sutra LP, also titled Do You Believe in Magic, followed in November 1965. Containing three other Sebastian originals and one song credited to the band, the balance of the LP contained traditional blues covers and songs by contemporary writers. Reaching #32 on the Billboard Top 200, it established the band as one of country’s brightest new talents.

By the release of their second album, Daydream, in March 1966, the band’s songwriting chops had fully blossomed, particularly Sebastian’s, who wrote or co-wrote all but one of the songs. The album’s first single, “You Didn’t Have to Be So Nice” reached #10 on the Hot 100 and married a signature Yanovsky riff with a galloping piano part to form an indelible hook. The title track, a mid-tempo reverie with an ace whistling solo, did even better, soaring to #2. Skipping ahead a few decades, the album cut “Butchie’s Tune” was used to great effect in season five of Mad Men.

The band soon returned with Hums of the Lovin’ Spoonful. Consciously working in different styles, the band essayed country (“Nashville Cats”), folk balladry (“Rain on the Roof”) and psych- tinged rock (“Summer in the City”), among other sounds. This time, all the songs were originals and it was the last full album recorded by the original quartet. It stands as a triumphant ending to one of the most exciting chapters in the American rock story of the 1960s, a perfect encapsulation of a time when it seemed anything was possible in music.

Sourced from the original Kama Sutra mono masters, these masterpieces are pressed at RTI on 180gm vinyl, and are also available as limited edition compact discs!

• 180 Gram R.T.I. Vinyl Pressing
• Limited Compact Disc Edition
• From the Original Kama Sutra Mono Masters




Click HERE for more info on Daydream - Mono Edition CD




TRACK LISTING:
1. Lovin You
2. Bes' Friends
3. Voodoo In My Basement
4. Darlin' Companion
5. Henry Thomas
6. Full Measure
7. Rain On The Roof
8. Coconut Grove
9. Nashville Cats
10. Four Eyes
11. Summer In The City

The Lovin' Spoonful

compact disc | $12.98  $11.68

SC 6336

Add to Cart

Preorder now and save 10%!
This title is available for preorder and will ship on or before the street date of June 30th.

Mono Editions on 180 gram vinyl and compact disc.

Greenwich Village, 1964: While the folk boom is still in progress, other musics began seeping into the corners and clubs of lower Manhattan. Rock, once down for the count, came back with a vengeance, largely thanks to a klatch of young British bands. Roots music, especially blues, grew rapidly in popularity as folk enthusiasts expanded their horizons. In this intoxicating milieu, John Sebastian, Zal Yanovsky, Joe Butler and Steve Boone united to form the Lovin’ Spoonful. Originally a jug band with folk roots, they readily incorporated the sounds they heard all around them. Combining British Invasion jangle with the blues’ growl and folk’s attention to lyrical detail, they forged a sound completely their own. Accomplished musicians all, they had two secret weapons: the guitar virtuosity of Zal Yanovsky and the rising songwriting talent of John Sebastian.

The first Spoonful single, “Do You Believe in Magic,” took AM radio by storm in June of that year, reaching #9 on the Billboard Hot 100. Featuring an irrepressible melody, a chiming autoharp and Yanovsky’s tasteful fills, it was an audacious debut. Their inaugural Kama Sutra LP, also titled Do You Believe in Magic, followed in November 1965. Containing three other Sebastian originals and one song credited to the band, the balance of the LP contained traditional blues covers and songs by contemporary writers. Reaching #32 on the Billboard Top 200, it established the band as one of country’s brightest new talents.

By the release of their second album, Daydream, in March 1966, the band’s songwriting chops had fully blossomed, particularly Sebastian’s, who wrote or co-wrote all but one of the songs. The album’s first single, “You Didn’t Have to Be So Nice” reached #10 on the Hot 100 and married a signature Yanovsky riff with a galloping piano part to form an indelible hook. The title track, a mid-tempo reverie with an ace whistling solo, did even better, soaring to #2. Skipping ahead a few decades, the album cut “Butchie’s Tune” was used to great effect in season five of Mad Men.

The band soon returned with Hums of the Lovin’ Spoonful. Consciously working in different styles, the band essayed country (“Nashville Cats”), folk balladry (“Rain on the Roof”) and psych- tinged rock (“Summer in the City”), among other sounds. This time, all the songs were originals and it was the last full album recorded by the original quartet. It stands as a triumphant ending to one of the most exciting chapters in the American rock story of the 1960s, a perfect encapsulation of a time when it seemed anything was possible in music.

Sourced from the original Kama Sutra mono masters, these masterpieces are pressed at RTI on 180gm vinyl, and are also available as limited edition compact discs!

• 180 Gram R.T.I. Vinyl Pressing
• Limited Compact Disc Edition
• From the Original Kama Sutra Mono Masters




Click HERE for more info on Hums Of The Lovin' Spoonful - Mono Edition CD